BMAT Guides

Convert raw marks with these BMAT score conversion tables (incl. Section 3)

Use the BMAT score conversion tables below to convert raw past paper marks in all three sections.  The BMAT score conversion tables below for section 1 and 2 are based on the official conversion table document and should be used to convert your raw marks in both sections.  The section 3 conversion table on the other hand is based on the official marking criteria and the scoring system used in our free BMAT essay marking guide. Please note that our scoring system is NOT endorsed by the official BMAT exam. However, we have designed all three to bark on the side of caution, so that in most cases, a similar [Read More]

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BMAT Guides

Advice From High Scoring Candidates that took the BMAT 2017

In this article, I share top tips and advice from some of the candidates that took the BMAT 2017.  We had the pleasure of speaking to 33 students that took the BMAT 2017. Their average score in section 1 and 2 were 6 and 6.5, respectively, and the lowest essay score was 4C. These were past readers of the blog and students that I reached out to on The Student Room that was giving valuable advice. During my research, I made sure the contributors fulfilled a particular set of criteria’s that were important to establish credibility: A Good BMAT score (6+ in Section 1 and 2, at least 4C in Section 3) [Read More]

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BMAT Guides

How to use the BMAT syllabus to analyse missed questions in Section 2

The BMAT syllabus outlines the science and maths knowledge assessed in BMAT Section 2. In this article, we will look at how to use it to analyse incorrect questions and pinpoint underlying issues. Section 2 questions may draw upon any parts of the syllabus and may include topics from more than one area.  The Basics In a previous guide, I shared a proven strategy to help analyse incorrect questions during BMAT practice. The article explains the three tiers to analyse incorrect answers, which are: Stimulus-type (the presented material) Question-type (the type of question) Skills/Reasoning-type (the skill or thinking required) Unfortunately, when it comes to section 2, most students only analyse [Read More]

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BMAT Guides

How to set BMAT practice tests during revision

In this article, we will look at how to set BMAT practice tests. Firstly, it is worth noting that practice tests do not necessarily mean BMAT past papers. Many books and courses include practice questions which are not from official papers that can be used to set BMAT practice tests. Generally, I recommend saving past papers for fully timed mocks under exam conditions. Whilst practice tests could be a more of a “build-up” to a full mock. So this poses the question, how do you set BMAT practice tests? Well, it depends on your goal, whether you are looking to improve your accuracy or speed. Accuracy  When focussed on exam accuracy, [Read More]

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BMAT Guides

How to use the BMAT Specification for section 2

The BMAT specification (or syllabus) is an official guide to help with working on any gaps in knowledge. In this article, we will look at how to use it to get up to speed in the exam. The following are my tips on working through the official BMAT specification. Use it as a rough guide during study. Step #1. Do a quick comfortability test Start by skimming through the BMAT syllabus and ticking off the topics that you are confident in solving problems. The idea is that unticked topics will take priority during revision. I recommend completing at least two comfortability tests during BMAT study, one at the beginning and [Read More]

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BMAT tips

How to analyse wrong questions during BMAT practice

Getting a question wrong during BMAT practice offers the opportunity to learn something new about the exam and yourself. But improvement only happens if you are reviewing questions the right way. I recommend analysing questions at three levels. 1 – the Stimulus type (the material being analysed), 2 – the Question type (the kind of question presented) and, 3 – the Skill/Reasoning type (the skill/reasoning required to solve the problem). Most students only analyse the question type, and sadly this doesn’t paint the full picture. You can find a more detailed explanation here.